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1

Gar Wood 22' 1936 Classic Runabout

Gar Wood 22' triple cockpit runabout boat built in 1936. An open cruiser with aft 2-person bench seat which is removable for steering access. A centered engine hatch just aft of amidships. A 3-person bench seat which has a small wooden cut-out for storage forward and a boat hook mounted just below. Lastly is the forward 3-person bench seat with helms stanchion starboard. Fold down glass, controls and original search light at dash. Has original Kidde fire extinguisher for show, original search light mounted starboard bow at helm; anchor light on post pole. Full boat cover in good condition. Single inboard gasoline 315 horsepower engine. 8 cylinders. Registration number CF 2894 KG, hull identification number 5775. Buyer must arrange delivery. 

Estimate: $60,000 - $80,000
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2

Federal Mahogany Inlaid and Parcel-Gilt Eglomise Mirror, New York, circa 1810

Federal mahogany inlaid and parcel-gilt eglomise mirror. New York. Circa 1810. Dimensions: 58.5"h x 20.75"w. For shipping quote, please contact Box Brothers Sacramento at boxbrosacto@gmail.com. 

Estimate: $1,000 - $2,500
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$1,210
09/16/2020

Internet Bidding

3

Eben W. Haskell Table

Eben W. Haskell six sided walnut table. Bears brass plate on underside, "Eben W. Haskell". Dimensions: 29.75"h x 51.25" x 66.25". Please contact Delbert McCrea (831-566-6088) for shipping quote.

Estimate: $5,000 - $10,000
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$3,025
09/16/2020

Internet Bidding

4

Chippendale Figured Maple Slant Front Desk, Pennsylvania, circa 1760-1780

Chippendale figured maple slant front desk having extensive interior detailing. Pennsylvania. Circa 1760-1780. Dimensions: 43.75"h x 40.5"w x 20.5"d. For shipping quote, please contact Delbert McCrea, 831-566-6088.

Estimate: $1,000 - $2,500
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$6,050
09/16/2020

Internet Bidding

5

Stickley Brothers Strap Hinge Sideboard

Stickley Brothers strap hinge sideboard. Dimensions: 50"h x 72"w x 24.67"d. For shipping quote, please contact Delbert McCrea, 831-566-6088.

Estimate: $1,000 - $2,500
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$3,025
09/16/2020

Internet Bidding

6

Pottier and Stymus 3-Piece Chamber Suite Commissioned for Mark Hopkins San Francisco Residence

Pottier and Stymus 3 piece chamber suite commissioned for the Mark and Mary Hopkins' Nob Hill, San Francisco mansion. Carved mahogany with gilt highlights and extensive marquetry inlay. Each piece marked with Pottier and Stymus numeric system: dresser marked "56062", commode marked "56061", bed marked. Molding at top of dresser marked in period script, "to be attached to top of Hopkins mirror" - this is the first definitive reference which connects Pottier and Stymus to the Mark Hopkins San Francisco mansion. Dimensions: (Canopy) 30.12" x 73.5". Extreme dimensions: (bed) 11'.5"h x 73.5"w x 86.25"d; (dresser) 97"h x 51.5"w x 22.25"d; (commode) 31.62"h x 17.62"w x 15.75"d. Mattress size 61" x 80". Provenance: Timothy Hopkins (son of Mark and Mary Hopkins) bequeathed Thurlow Lodge (including furniture from the San Francisco mansion) to Stanford University prior to 1942. Stanford then consigned all the furniture to Butterfields / Bonhams to be auctioned. Prior to that, the President of Stanford was directed to keep whatever pieces of furniture he desired. This chamber suite was kept by him and remained in his family. 

This is the first piece which confirms that Pottier and Stymus were also commissioned by Hopkins for their San Francisco mansion in addition to Herter Brothers. A Lady's Secretary in the Newark Museum, originally part of the original Bonham's Auction of Hopkins family furniture, is thought to be Pottier and Stymus as opposed to Herter Brothers due to the numeric code (56012) on the piece. (Pottier and Stymus kept a sequential numerical record of their products which assists in decoding their original location). 

Mark Hopkins (1813-1878) was known as one of the "Big Four" in San Francisco in the late 19th century. He was one of the founders of the Central Pacific Railroad. Hopkins choose to build his mansion on the fashionable Nob Hill (originally called California Hill) where his fellow multimillionaires also resided. Sadly Hopkins would not see his mansion and it was completed in 1878 after his death. The palatial mansion survived the 1906 earthquake but was destroyed in the fire that followed in the days after. The house, as well as Sherwood Hall in Menlo Park (built in the early 1870s as Thurlow Lodge for Milton Latham, and also decorated by Herter Brothers) were both given to Mrs. Hopkins adopted son, Timothy Nolan Hopkins. Mrs. Hopkins died in 1891 (having married Edward Searles, the chief operative for Herter Brothers in San Francisco in 1887). After her death, Timothy Hopkins and his wife Mary gave the Nob Hill house to the city, for which it became the Mark Hopkins Institute of Art; and the furniture was removed to Sherwood Hall. The Nob Hill house burned in the earthquake of 1906, and Sherwood Hall was damaged. Timothy and Mary Hopkins apparently built a house in San Francisco, and it was here that the widowed Mrs. Timothy Hopkins died in 1942. Her estate was auctioned off by Butterfields/Bonhams  in that year.

One of the most prominent and largest American design and manufacturing firms of high quality furniture of the Victorian period, Pottier & Stymus produced furniture in the Neo-Greco, Renaissance Revival, Egyptian Revival, and Modern Gothic styles. The company supplied furniture to the President's office and the Cabinet Room in the White House in 1869, and for the homes of such well-to-do families as the Rockefellers and railway baron Leland Stanford.

For shipping quote, please contact Delbert McCrea, 831-566-6088.

 

Estimate: $25,000 - $50,000
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$12,100
09/16/2020

Internet Bidding

7

Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom's Cabin: or, Life among the Lowly

 

HARRIET BEECHER STOWE, 1811‑1896.  Uncle Tom's Cabin: or, Life among the Lowly. By Harriet Beecher Stowe [engraving] Boston: John. P. Jewett & Company. Cleveland, Ohio: Jewett, Proctor & Worthington. 1852. 2 Vols. 

 

COLLATION: Vol. 1: 2 blank leaves, [iii] title, [iv] copyright and printer’s imprint, [v] vi-viii preface, [ix]-x contents, [11] 12-312 text, original cloth front cover and spine mounted on 2 leaves, 2 blank leaves. 7½ x 5 in. Some foxing and browning. Staining to fore-edge of vol. I. 

Vol. II: 2 blank leaves, [i] title, [ii] copyright, [iii]-iv contents, [5] 6-322 text, original cloth front cover and spine mounted on 2 leaves, 2 blank leaves. 

BINDING: full dark brown morocco over boards with gilt borders, spines with gilt title, author, date and raised bands; decorative endpapers with gilt morocco borders. Gilt tops. Minor shelf wear; heads of spines worn. 

PLATES: 3 engravings each vol.  

 

REFERENCES: BAL: 19343; Downs, Books That Changed America, 108; Printing and the Mind of Man 332; Sabin 92457

 

This is the rare first edition, first issue of Stowe’s famous work that swept the nation and gave real momentum to the abolitionist movement. It helped fuel the national division that led to the Civil War. The volumes were stereotyped by Hobart & Robbins of Boston. Processing and shipping within the continental U.S. $25.00 plus 1.5% replacement cost insurance. 

 

 

 

 

 

Estimate: $5,000 - $10,000
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8

A Key to Uncle Harriet Beecher Stowe, Tom's Cabin; Presenting the Original Facts and Documents

Upon Which the Story is founded with Corroborative Statements Verifying the Truth of the Work. Author of “Uncle Tom’s Cabin.” Boston: John. P. Jewett & Company. Cleveland, Ohio: Jewett, Proctor & Worthington. London: Low and Company. 1853. 

 

COLLATION: blank leaf, [i] title, [ii] copyright, [iii]-iv preface, [5] 6-259 text (in double columns), [260] 261-262 and erratum, advt. leaf, 2 blank leaves. 9½ x 6½ in. Text is bright. 

BINDING: full dark brown morocco over boards with gilt borders, spine with gilt title, author, date and raised bands; decorative endpapers with gilt morocco borders. Gilt top. Minor shelf wear; heads of spines worn; fading to front cover. Front cover loose; stained endpaper edges. 

 

REFERENCES: Sabin 92412.

 

“A Key” is an essential companion to Stowe’s earthshaking novel. Southern slaveholders, of course, attacked her novel as misrepresenting slavery and as totally unreliable. This publication, through firsthand sources, thoroughly supported her view of the evils wreaked upon African Americans. Like the novel, this was stereotyped by Hobart & Robbins but unlike the novel, printed by Damrell & Moore, both of Boston. Processing and shipping within the continental U.S. $25.00 plus 1.5% replacement cost insurance.

Estimate: $1,000 - $2,500
Unsold

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9

Edward Vischer. Pictorial of California Landscape. Stray Leaves from the Pacific! Life and Scenery in the Western Slopes, from the Coast Range to the Summits of the Sierra Nevada, and Glimpses of the Desert; the Natural Wonders of California; Characterist

 Edward Vischer. Pictorial of California Landscape. Stray Leaves from the Pacific! Life and Scenery in the Western Slopes, from the Coast Range to the Summits of the Sierra Nevada, and Glimpses of the Desert; the Natural Wonders of California; Characteristic Landscape; Rural and Forest Scenes, Studies from Nature. Photographs from Originals, In Series, Each Containing Twelve Numbers, with a Supplement of Contributions from Reliable Sources. San Francisco, 1867. (Copyright Secured). Edward Vischer. [variant title, pastedown on inside front cover of box]. Edward Vischer. Pictorial of California Landscape. Stray Leaves from the Pacific! Life and Scenery in the Western Slopes, from the Coast Range to the Summits of the Sierra Nevada, and Glimpses of the Desert; the Natural Wonders of California; Characteristic Landscape; Rural and Forest Scenes, Studies from Nature. Photographs from Originals, In Series, Each Containing Twelve Numbers. Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1863, by Edward Vischer, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the U.S. for the Northern District of California. San Francisco: No. 515 Jackson Street, above Montgomery. Robbins & Co., Printers, 417 Clay St. Phot. by Geo H. Johnson, 619 Clay St. 7 x 9in. Binding: All contents including supplements are in a custom made box of brown leather over boards with blind stamped and black ornamentation. Held in place by leather strap inserted through a loop. California gold stamped on front cover. Box or portfolio shows wear along the edges and the strap is separated from portfolio style box. Plates: 141 albumen photographs mounted on heavy paper of Vischer's drawings. The paper with the mounted photographs show minor warping. 

[Divisional title] Vischer's Pictorial of California. Sixty Views of Californian Landscape. [Divided into 12 segments, each with a separate card with the title; photographs mounted on heavy board.]

[Divisional title] Supplement. Rural and Forest Scenes, Grand Features of California Landscape, Life, Traffic, and Customs. Author's Own Sketches, with Artist's Friendly Contributions to Vischer's Pictorial. Copyright Secured for Author's Own Sketches. 

Added to the supplement; 41 mounted photographs of Oak Knoll, Napa Valley, Farm of J.W. Osborn; miscellaneous view of missions, farming scenes, ships on San Francisco Bay, and the California coastline. Added insert: [printed wrappers.] Missions of Upper California, 1872. By Edward Vischer. Notes on the California Missions, a Supplement to Vischer's Pictorial of California, Dedicated to Its Patrons. San Francisco: Winterburn & Co., Printers and Electrotypers, 417 Clay Street, 1872. Collation: [I]title, [ii]introduction, [1-3]4-44 text, [I]ii-viii appendix, [I]ii-iv notes, [1-2] Excerpt from San Francisco Examiner, June 17, 1870. 9 x 6 in. References: Cowan, p.662; Currey & Kruska 380; Eberstadt 124:16; Graff 4492; Howes V131; Palmquist and Kailbourn, pp.571-573; Peters pp. 198-202; Rocq 17214, Streeter 2930.

Born in Bavaria in 1808, Vischer came to California in 1842, returned home and then put down roots in San Francisco during the frenetic year of 1849, returned home and then put down roots in San Francisco during the frenetic year of 1849 and built a Bavarian style home on Nob Hill. Working as a merchant and real estate agent, his work gave him the enjoyable opportunity of visiting historic sites like the missions, mining towns, water works, High Sierra passes and summits, Lake Tahoe and its breathtaking natural wonders like the giant sequoias. Ever since his first visit to California, Vischer became enamored by California's Hispanic past and its pastoral days and the desire to share truthful images of this earthly paradise with a broad audience. Somewhat apologetic in his publication title, he used phrases like "Miscellaneous Views" and "Stray Leaves from the Pacific". What he achieved, though, was a real tour-de-force of the Golden State with an understandable emphasis on Northern California.

Last owned by C.K. McClatchy, this portfolio is a unique gathering of artist Edward Vischer's photographs of his documentary drawings of California scenes that he made between 1858 and 1867. Simply put, it is one of the most ambitious works generated during the pioneer days of California book production and serves as an important early example of using original photographs to illustrate a publication. Like with his earlier work on the Mammoth Tree Grove (see below). Vischer planned to reproduce his drawings via lithography. However, several stones broke and he decided to employ the relatively new medium of photography. Moreover, he did not have to rely on another artist to copy his drawings in reverse on a lithograph stone as he did with the Mammoth Trees. All the images housed in this especially-made box are actual photographs printed from glass plate negatives and painstakingly mounted on heavy paper. Each of the sixty plates in the first section includes a printed caption and copyright date of 1863. To obtain the photographic reproductions of his sketches, he contracted with well established San Francisco photographer George H. Johnson. In analyzing the McClatchy portfolio, one must agree with the esteemed bibliographer, Robert E. Cowan who noted that "few copies contain precisely the same number of plates." In promoting this beautiful but complex pictorial, Vischer printed a prospectus advertising the work in four formats with between 100 and 120 plates. The McClatchy copy is further enriched with an additional group of forty one plates. Moreover, this particular copy comes with a rare wrapper bound book by Vischer titled Missions of Upper California. Given its publication date of 1872, it must have been added later. An examination of Vischer's Pictorial reveals that on a very limited basis he added the work of other well established California artists including Thomas Hill and Thomas Ayres. These appeared in the "Supplement". He also added an original albumen photograph of a "Nugget of Gold" taken by Carleton E. Watkins, California's premier nineteenth century photographer. Another image is a beautiful oval shaped anonymous photograph of the steamships Chrysopolis and Cornelia at dock. Two of the plates are reproductions of wood engravings of California mining from The Miner's Own Book published by Hutchings & Rosenfield in 1859 (see above).

Processing and shipping within the continental U.S. $25.00 plus 1.5% replacement cost insurance. Witherell's strives to provide as much information and photographs as possible but encourages in-person inspection by bidders. Condition statements are only for general guidance and should not be relied upon as complete statements of fact and do not constitute a representation, warranty or assumption of liability by Witherell's. All lots are sold "AS IS" under terms and conditions. Please be advised we do not provide porters nor packing materials for pick ups.

Estimate: $10,000 - $20,000
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$18,150
09/16/2020

Internet Bidding

10

Fremont, John Charles. Report of the Exploring Expedition to the Rocky Mountains in the Year 1842

Fremont, John Charles. Report of the Exploring Expedition to the Rocky Mountains in the Year 1842, and to Oregon and North California in the Years 1843-'44. By Brevet Captain J.C. Fremont, of the Topographical Engineers, under the Orders of Col. J.J. Abert, Chief of the Topographical Bureau. Printed by Order of the Senate of the United States. Washington: Gales and Seaton, Printers. 1845.

Collation: [I-ii]blank, [1]title, [2]3-132 text, fold. map, 133-136 text, map, 137-154 text, map, 155-246 text, fold. map, 247-319 text, [320] blank, 321-693 astronomical and meteorological observations, [694] blank, fold. map, inside pocket. 9 x 5 1/2 in. The text leaves show some browning, typical of that era. Binding: Dark brown blind stamped cloth over boards; backstop: gold stamped: (4 lines) Fremont's First & Second Expeditions 1842-3-4. The cloth binding is in fine condition with the exception of a few wear marks on the corners and top of the backstop. Maps: No. 1. Between pp. 132-133, fold. Untitled route map in Bear River Valley. 18 1/2 x 9 in. No. 2. The Great Salt-Lake. 9 x 5 1/2 in. No. 3 Between pp. 246-247, fold. Untitled route map from the Rio Sacramento and Nueva Helvetia over the Sierra Nevada via the American River and Lake Tahoe. 9 x 25 in. No. 4. Pocket map inserted into rear binding, fold. Map of an Exploring Expedition to the Rocky Mountains in the year 1842. Oregon & North California in the Years 1843-1844 by Brevet Captaincies. J.C. Fremont of the Corps of Topographical Engineers Under the Orders of Col. J.J. Abert, Chief of Topographical Bureau. Lith. By E. Weber & Co., Baltimore, Md. 30 1/4 x 50 1/2 in. Plates: 20 lithographs. Wagner-Camp-Becker calls for 22 plates. References: Down I, p.91; Cowan II, pp. 223-224; Graff 1436; Howell 50/88; Howes F370; Streeter 3131, Wagner-Camp-Becker, 115:1.

This is a beautiful first edition of Fremont's massive government report documenting his two Western expeditions of 1842 and 1843-44 comprising 20,000 miles of wilderness exploration had an immeasurable influence in opening the vast territory to American expansion. In many ways it became the fade mecum of "Manifest Destiny". The second expedition had the crucial effect of linking the interior with the surveys of Commodore Charles Wilkes along the Pacific Coast. Accompanying him were the well-known mountain men, Kit Carson, Alexis Godey and Thomas Fitzpatrick. Demonstrating the potency of his report, he described the Great Salt Lake as a "bucolic place". A future reader, Brigham Young, read his report and decided that this remote location was indeed "the place" for his persecuted Mormon followers. William Goetzman in his monumental Exploration and Empire, commented that "Fremont's view of California was important. He was one of the first and certainly one of the most widely red observers to printout its agricultural virtues." No doubt, too, the plates gave America a dramatic view of its rugged landscape. Especially interesting is "Pass in the Sierra Nevada of California" showing the explorers deep n snow. As is well known, the Pathfinder's devoted wife, Jesse Benton Fremont, provided unstinting support and inspiration in the writing of text. because of her, the daily entries have an absorbing, magnetic quality. A key feature of the publication is the large folding map by Fremont's cartographer Charles Preuss, which incorporated both expeditions and covered, as the great explorer explained:"about ten thousand miles of actual traveling and traversing in the wilderness which lies between the frontiers of Missouri and the shores of the Pacific." It is truly a landmark in Western cartography. To further assist the reader, Fremont supplemented the map with a table of distances from Kansas Landing to Fort Vancouver , 1843 and 1844. Immensely popular, twenty five editions were published between 1845 and 1860 but the maps were not always included in the later versions. The federal government did not publish all the editions as several were printed and distributed by such firms as D. Appleton & Company and H.H. Bancroft & Company.

 Processing and shipping within the continental U.S. $25.00 plus 1.5% replacement cost insurance. Witherell's strives to provide as much information and photographs as possible but encourages in-person inspection by bidders. Condition statements are only for general guidance and should not be relied upon as complete statements of fact and do not constitute a representation, warranty or assumption of liability by Witherell's. All lots are sold "AS IS" under terms and conditions. Please be advised we do not provide porters nor packing materials for pick ups.

Estimate: $1,000 - $2,500
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$1,089
09/16/2020

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11

Side, Simeon. A Biographical Sketch of the Life of William B. Ide

Ide, Simeon. A Biographical Sketch of the Life of William B. Ide: with a Minute and Interesting Account of One of the Largest Emigration Companies, (3000 Miles Over Land), from the East to the Pacific Coast. And What Is Claimed as the Most Authentic and Reliable Account of the "Virtual Conquest of California, in June, 1846, by the Bear Flag Party," as Given by Its Leader, the Late Hon. William Brown Ide. Published for the Subscribers. [Claremont, N.H. 1880].

Collation: [I]half-title, [ii]blank, [1]title, [2] copyright 1880 by Simeon Ide, [4]-4 preface, [5]6-8 contents, [9]10-239, [240]Inscription, 2 blank leaves. 6 3/4 x 4 1/2 in. Binding: Half crushed-grained leather over cloth. Gold-stamped title on front cover: THE CONQUEST OF CALIFORNIA BY THE BEAR FLAG PARTY ORGANIZED AND LED BY WILLIAM B. IDE. Marble endpapers; all edges dyed red. Leather backstop and corners show wear and front cloth with title shows heavy staining. The book is placed in a protective half crushed-grained dark blue leather slip case over light blue cloth boards with blue cloth slip case and interior decorative marble paper. References: Cowan, I, p.118, 270-71; Cowan II, p.301; Graff 2059; Holliday 544; Howes I-4; Norris 1714, Sloan-Kurutz, Zamorano 80, pp. 156-59 [Volkmann Collection]; Streeter 2967; Zamorano 80 #45.

Ever since its publication in 1880, this crucial and rare first edition on the Bear Flag Revolt of one 14, 1846, has received much attention in historical and rare book circles as demonstrated by its inclusion in the famous Zamorano 80, a list of the eighty most important books on California history selected by the prestigious Zamorano Club of Los Angeles in 1945. California biographer Robert E. Cowan, provides important information concerning its publication history and rarity: "His [William B. Ide] death occurred in California in 1852. This work was set in type by Simeon Ide [a New Hampshire printer and brother] when in his 86th year. Having apparently been issued amid difficulties, only a small number was printed and the work is scarce." Another source states that only eighty copies were printed. Brother Simeon Ide,in assembling and printing these "scrapes of history" about William Brown Ide wanted to establish his sibling's place in history as the true conqueror of Mexican California and not John C. Fremont or U.S. forces. For a short-lived period of twenty two days, William Ide, one of the leaders of the famed Bear Flag Revolt, became "Commander in Chief" of the California Republic. Even with its adulatory, self serving purpose, Simeon's book contains a wealth of firsthand information on the activities of the Bear Flaggers, the capture of Sonoma and General Mariano Vallejo, establishment of a so-called republic, and the final conquest of California by the United States. Certainly, the central theme that Simeon wanted to promote was hi brother's George Washington like role in establishing the "California Republic." The key document that accounts for the book's importance is "President" Ide's own narrative justifying the rebellion and its aftermath in a letter he wrote to Senator W.W. Wambough before his death in 1852. There has been much debate over the importance of the insurrection and "President" Ide. Historian Sharon A. Brown, in a careful review of primary sources including the testimony of Bear Flaggers, concluded that Ide's Authority was not taken seriously and they viewed him as an "Idealist" and "policy maker" and not as a military leader. What often is overlooked is Simon's account of Ide family history and his brother's overland trek to California in 1845. Simeon Ide's immortalization of his brother has as complex a bibliographic history as the revolt itself. At least three variants of A Biographical Sketch are known. That same year, Simeon produced another publication, Who Conquered California? (his brother of course) which is a partially reset, abridged version of A Biographical Sketch, with a new preface but without the Ide family history and the overland narratives.

 Processing and shipping within the continental U.S. $25.00 plus 1.5% replacement cost insurance. Witherell's strives to provide as much information and photographs as possible but encourages in-person inspection by bidders. Condition statements are only for general guidance and should not be relied upon as complete statements of fact and do not constitute a representation, warranty or assumption of liability by Witherell's. All lots are sold "AS IS" under terms and conditions. Please be advised we do not provide porters nor packing materials for pick ups.

Estimate: $1,000 - $2,500
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$726
09/16/2020

Internet Bidding

12

California And New Mexico. Message from the President of the United States 1850

CALIFORNIA AND NEW MEXICO. Message from the President of the United States Communicating Information Called for by a Resolution of the House of the 31st of December, 1849, on the Subject of California and New Mexico. January 24, 1850. 

Series Title: House of Representatives. 31st Congress, 1st Session; Executive Document No. 17

Washington, D.C.

 

COLLATION: [1] 2-976 text. 9 x 5½ in. Foxing, browning, acid stains from bookmarks. 

BINDING: half leather over marbled boards; spine: gilt title and rules; beige endpapers. Binding is loose with repair tape; spine chipped. 

MAPS: 7 maps (6 fold.) All by Ackerman Lithr. Facing: 

No. 1. p. 176. Map of Fort Hill [line cut] Monterey California. Reduced by Scale from Lieut. Warner’s Filed Map made in 1847 by P. M. McGill C.E. 15 x 9½ in. 

No. 2. p. 177. Untitled map of Golden Gate & north shore, San Francisco Peninsula. 16½ x 8½ in. 

No. 3. p. pp. 608. Untitled map of Lower California. 12½ x 17½ in. 

No. 4. p. 609. Sketch of Port Escondido, Lower California. 12 x 8½ in. 

No. 5. p. 944. Map of Oregon and Upper California from the Surveys of John Charles Frémont and Other Authorities. Drawn by Charles Preuss under the Order of the Senate of the United States. Washington City. 1848. 23 x 18½ in. Tear at hinge and creases. 

No. 6. [in between] pp. 944-945. Sketch of General Riley’s Route through the Mining Districts July and Aug. 1849. Copied from the Original Sketch by Lt. Derby in the Office of the 10t Military Dept by J. Mc H. Hollingsworth Asst. 22 x 20 in. Tear at hinge and creases.

No. 7. Not fold. p. 945. Plan of the Route of the Expedition of Major Beall, 1st Drag’s for the Relief of the Wagons of Mr. F. X. Aubrey against the Apache Indians. 7¾ x 5 in. 

 

REFERENCES: Cowan II, p. 875; Howes C-53; Kurutz 106b; Volkmann, Zamorano 80, 14, Wagner-Camp-Becker 179b:2; Wheat, Books, 31; Zamorano 80, 14

 

This thick Federal Government document stands as the foremost assemblage of printed official documents concerning Alta California’s transition from a Mexican possession to a U.S. controlled territory prior to its admission as a state on September 9, 1850. Bennet Riley, the 7th and last American military governor of California, wrote many of the letters and reports and called for a constitutional convention to create a civil government. Many of the official documents were written by S.W. Kearny, R. B. Mason, H. W. Halleck, and Persifor F. Smith among others. A much smaller percentage of the document pertains to New Mexico. Henry R. Wagner wrote: “The importance of this message wass so great that Congress had 10,000 extra copies printed.”

 

 

 

 

 

Estimate: $1,000 - $2,500
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$605
09/16/2020

Internet Bidding

13

Slater, Nelson, Fruits of Mormonism, or a Fair and Candid Statement of Facts Illustrative of Mormon Principles, Mormon Policy, and Mormon Character

Slater, Nelson. Fruits of Mormonism, or a Fair and Candid Statement of Facts Illustrative of Mormon Principles, Mormon Policy and Mormon Character, by More than Fort Eyewitnesses, Compiled by N. Slater, A.M. Coloma, Cal., Harmon & Springer 1851. Collation: [i] title, [ii]copyright, [1]2-4 introduction, [5] 6-93 text, [94] conclusion. 7" x 5.25". This rare pamphlet is elegantly bound in maroon crushed-grained leather with gilt edges; the ornamental spine features the author and title gold stamped on an inlaid black strip over the maroon spine. The spine is further decorated with two raised bands flanked by gilt ornaments. The front and rear pastedown are of decorative marble paper with ornamental gilt borders. The volume comes in a decorative clamshell case with a maroon leather spine over tan boards. Soft fabric is pasted in the inside covers and the imprint of "The Lakeside Press, Chicago" is in gilt.

This attack on Mormonism and their alleged mishandling of overland travelers on their way to gold fields during the winter of 1850 received much publicity in the San Francisco press. The conclusion of this controversial work explained its purpose: "The foregoing papers present a candid expression of the opinions entertained by the emigrants generally. The emigrants are indignant at the treatment they received from the Mormons the past winter and spring, and feel in duty bound to protest against such conducts towards U.S. citizens while passing through [Salt Lake City and] Utah territory." Seeking revenge, Fruits of Mormonism includes a petition sent by the emigrants to the U.S. Congress "to abolish the present territorial government of Utah and establish a military government in its stead." Included is a long list of names of emigrants who signed the petition. Despite the bitterness of the text, it does provide extensive information on overland travel.

Slater's polemic does have the distinction of being the first and perhaps only 19th c book printed in the gold discovery town of Coloma and it is the first book entered for copyright in CA. The copyright date was October 25, 1851.

References: Cowan I, p.216; Cowan II, p. 501; Graff 3814; Greenwood 301; Howes S-542; Kurutz 585; Streeter 2686; Wagner-Camo-Becker 205; Wheat, Book, 190. Processing and shipping within the continental U.S. $25.00 plus 1.5% replacement cost insurance. 

Estimate: $5,000 - $10,000
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$9,680
09/16/2020

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14

A.B. Clarke, Travels in Mexico and Travels in Mexico and California

ASA BEMENT CLARKE. Travels in Mexico and Travels in Mexico and California: Comprising a Journal of a Tour from Brazos Santiago, through Central Mexico, by Way of Monterey, Chihuahua, the Country of the Apaches, and the River Gila, to the Mining Districts of California. By A. B. Clarke. 

Boston: | Wright & Hasty, Printers, | No. 3. Water Street. | 1852. 

 

COLLATION: consisting of: [1] title, [2] copyright, [3] note, [4] blank, [5] 6-138 text, [139-144] blank. 7¼ x 4¾ in. Pages are browned. 

BINDING: Original blind-stamped cloth over boards. Backstrip: gold-stamped title and ornamentation. Binding shows mild wear. Endpapers show browning. Front free endpaper: Virginia M. Clarke | Independence | Iowa. Dec. 25th 1861. Rear pastedown: “authors own copy” in pencil. 

 

REFERENCES: Cowan I, p. 48; Cowan II, p. 128; Graff 746; Howes C-451; Kurutz 138a; Norris 796; Sabin 13393; Streeter 3169; Wagner-Camp-Becker 210

 

Clarke, a native of Conway, Massachusetts, sailed from New York on January 29, 1849, as a member of the Hampden Mining Company. By August 2, the New Englander labored in the Tuolumne Diggings. He spent the winter of 1849 and 1850 in San Francisco and, in the summer of 1850, worked on the Yuba River. Only the last five pages of his account describe life in the mines. According to the author: "After spending a considerable portion of 1850 in Mercantile Business in Sacramento and Marysville, I arrived home in March, 1851."

 

Wagner and other bibliographies call for this to be bound in wrappers. A note laid into the McClatchy copy states: This copy is evidently one of a few copies bound for the author’s own use. That it was the author’s own copy is almost beyond doubt.” The inscription of Virginia M. Clarke on the flyleaf supports this as she was the daughter of A. B. Clarke.  The note further states: “Mr. [Henry R.] Wagner says this is the only copy with cloth binding he has ever seen.”  Processing and shipping within the continental U.S. $25.00 plus 1.5% replacement cost insurance. 

Estimate: $1,000 - $2,500
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$1,815
09/16/2020

Internet Bidding

15

Western America, Including California and Oregon, with Maps of Those Regions, and of “The Sacramento Valley.” By Charles Wilkes, U.S.N.

Philadelphia: Lea and Blanchard. 1849. 

 

COLLATION: blank leaf, [i-ii] blank, fold. map, [iii] title, [iv] copyright and printer's imprint, v dedication, [vi] blank, vii-viii preface, ix contents, [x] blank, [irregular numbering], [13] 14-32 text, fold. map, 33-80 text, fold. map, 81-130 text. 8¾ x 5½ in. Minor browning to title page. 

BINDING: modern half polished calf over red cloth; spine: gilt title, author and date; new endpapers. Minor scuffing on spine and corners.

MAPS: front., fold: A Correct Map | from Actual Surveys and Examinations | Embracing a Portion of | California | between Monterey and the Prairie Butes [sic] | in the Valley of the | Sacramento | Shewing the | Placeres [sic] | 1849 | Drawn by F. D. Stuart | Soundings in Fathoms. | [below center] Entered according to act of Congress in the year 1849, by Lea & Blanchard, in the Clerk's office of the district court of the Eastern district of Pennsylvania. 23½ x 16½ in.

Facing p. 32: Map | of | Upper California | by the | Best Authorities | 1849. 8½ x 11¾ in. 

Facing p. 80: Map | of the | Oregon Territory | from the | Best Authorities. | 1849 | [lower right] Edwd. Yeager Sc. | [inset] Columbia River | Reduced from a Survey | Made by the | U.S. Ex. Ex. | 1841. 8¼ x 13¼ in. 

 

REFERENCES: Cowan I, p. 249; Cowan II, p. 683; Graff 4656; Holliday 1195; Howell 256; Howes W-416; Norris 4222; Randall 529; Rocq 16162; Sabin 103995; Sloan, Gold Rush, 163; Streeter 3226; Wagner-Camp-Becker 175a:1; Wheat, Books 229; Wheat, Maps 134, 135

 

Commander Wilkes compiled this work from data gathered while he was on the Pacific Coast commanding the United States Exploring Expedition from 1838 to 1842. Capitalizing on the gold discovery, he included a chapter on the mineral region drawn from official reports and his knowledge of the area's geology and his own opinion of gold specimens sent east. The preface was dated February 1, 1849. The map of the Sacramento Valley was an important source of information for gold seekers. Interestingly, the map titled “Map of Upper California” also included what would become Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, and Nevada. Processing and shipping within the continental U.S. $45.00 plus 1.5% replacement cost insurance. 

 

Estimate: $1,000 - $2,500
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$2,118
09/16/2020

Internet Bidding

16

Shaw, Pringle, Ramblings in California

Containing a Description of the Country, Life at the Mines, State of Society, &c. Interspersed with Characteristic Anecdotes, and Sketches from Life, Being the Five Years’ Experience of a Gold Digger. 

Toronto: James Bain, 37 King Street East. [1856] 

 

COLLATION: consisting of: [i] half-title, [ii] blank, [iii] title, [iv] printer's imprint, [v]-vi preface, [vii] contents, [viii] blank, 9-239 text, [240] blank. Text leaves fine and fresh. 7 x 4½ in. 

 

BINDING: Original blind-stamped black cloth. Front cover, gilt title. Edges trimmed. Tan endpapers. Binding condition is superior except for stain on lower right corner. 

REFERENCES: Cowan I, p. 210; Cowan II, p. 580; Howes S-348; Kurutz 570; Rocq 16051; Sabin 79954; Sloan, Gold Rush 127; Streeter 2855; Wheat, Books 184

 

 

In the preface, this Canadian gold digger wrote: "My business in California, was a gold speculation; and there, on the banks of the Yellow Yuba, and many other streams, I dug deep holes, and made –– not exactly my pile –– but my observations on men and things . . . I shall not so much regret that I prospected as faithfully for dry jokes, as wiser men did for dry diggings." Shaw, through this detailed volume, attempted to convey to the reader a true sense of what to expect in California. He included a fine account of the varied types of people found, and as recorder of mining claims, told of his experiences with the Chinese. He also added an elaborate depiction of mining methods and a general portrait of all the California counties, missions, and agricultural resources. The final portion of the book consisted of verbose anecdotes including "How I jumped a claim."  Processing and shipping within the continental U.S. $25.00 plus 1.5% replacement cost insurance.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Estimate: $1,000 - $2,500
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$605
09/16/2020

Internet Bidding

17

William Redmond Ryan. Personal Adventures in Upper and Lower California, in 1848–1849

With the Author’s Experience at the Mines. Illustrated by Twenty-three Drawings, Taken on the Spot. In Two Volumes. 

London: William Shoberl, Publisher. 20, Great Marlborough Street. 1850 

 

COLLATION: Vol. I: consisting of: [1] 2-4, publisher’s advts., front., [i] title, [ii] printer’s imprint, [iii] iv-vi preface, [vii] viii–x contents, [ix] illustrations, [for] Vols. I & II, [1] 2–347 text, [348] printer’s imprint. 

Vol. II: consisting of: front., [i] title, [ii] printer’s imprint, [iii] iv-vi contents, [1] 2–413 text, [414] printers imprint. 7¾ x 4¾ in.

BINDING: Blind-stamped ornamental red cloth. Front covers, gold-stamped illustration of two vaqueros. Spine, gold-stamped: Vol. I [II] [space] Shoberl | London. Edges trimmed, decorative endpapers. Slightly shelf worn; spines rebacked; ink stain on rear cover of Vol. II. 

PLATES: Vol. I: (all with tissue guards) front. (lithograph) and 9 wood engravings.

Vol II: (all with tissue guards) front. (lithograph) and 11 wood engravings and 1 lithograph. 

 

REFERENCES: Cowan I, p. 197; Cowan II, p. 547; Decker 32: 61; Eberstadt 125: 191; Graff 3626; Holliday 966; Howell 215; Howes R-558; Kurutz 548a; Norris 3340; Rocq 16037; Sloan, Gold Rush 122; Streeter 2646, Wheat, Books 173

 

An Englishman, Ryan enlisted in Colonel J. D. Stevenson’s First Regiment of New Volunteers in 1847 and landed in Monterey in February 1848 to begin the American takeover of California. Much of Volume I is devoted to his observations of Alta California before the Gold Rush and left his readers with a lively and fresh account. With the discovery of gold, he went off to the Stanislaus diggings for a brief and unsuccessful try at mining, and then returned to Monterey. He quickly realized that trading pistols and rifles yielded a much greater reward than digging for gold. The plates based on his drawings attest to his considerable skill and he created some of the best contemporary views of mining, cities, pueblos and daily life in California. Processing and shipping within the continental U.S. $40.00 plus 1.5% replacement cost insurance. 

Estimate: $1,000 - $2,500
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$1,210
09/16/2020

Internet Bidding

18

Dr. John F. Morse & Samuel Colville, Illustrated Historical Sketches of California

Dr. John F. Morse & Samuel Colville, Illustrated Historical Sketches of California, Including General References to Its Discovery, Early Missions, Revolutions, and Settlement by the United States; Together with a More Ample History of Sacramento Valley and City, and Biographical References to Prominent Individuals. Printed for the Publisher at the Democratic State Journal Office 1854. [wrapper title, within ornamental border] March 1854. No.1. Illustrated Historical Sketches of California, with a Minute History of Sacramento Valley. Together with an Appendix of General News. [vignette of Sutter's Fort] By Dr. John F. Morse, assisted by Samuel Colville, Publisher. Printed for the Publisher by John J. Hand, Corner of K and Second Streets, 1854. Collation:front, [I] title, [ii] dedication, [iii]-iv introduction, [5]6-46 text, [1-2]3-8 appendix. 8 1/2 x 5 3/4 in. Binding: Pink pictorial wrappers, inside covers, blank. Front wrapper; as above; Rear wrapper:"To the Public," Contents and Terms. Wrappers have been mounted on new backstop. Copy comes with protective slipcase; dark blue leather backstop over blue cloth boards. Backstrip: gold stamped title and date. Illustrations: all black and white engravings; two full page illustrations and 2 vignettes. References: Cowan I, p.157; Cowan II, p.444; Graff 2909; Greenwood 482; Howes M 844.

As astute collectors, the McClatchy's recognized the rarity and importance of acquiring the inaugural number of one of the earliest periodicals published west of the Mississippi. Its editor Dr. Morris is properly heralded as Sacramento's first historian. Although a physician, he was an able researcher and gifted writer. Given the fact that Sacramento had suffered through its worst fire in November 1852 and a flood on New Year's Day 1853, it is a testament not only to the determination and optimism of Morse but also to his publisher Samuel Colville to produce this periodical. they had planned to issue these "historical sketches" monthly and for the first issue focused the majority of the text on the history of the California missions. Of local interest, Morris did provide a detailed account of the arrival of Captain Sutter and his heroic efforts to develop the Sacramento valley writing, "The old Captain assures us that no man ever felt a greater glow of pleasure than he experienced when, for the first time, he commenced to break up the green-sward of Sacramento Valley as a practical farmer. To him it seemed almost a dream." The "Appendix of General News" consisted of a daily recital of California events in the month of February. The rear cover consists of a notice "To the Public" and Morris and Colville did warn readers of the cost of producing the journal hoping for a generous number of subscribers would sustain their effort. Single copies sold for fifty cents; a dozen for $4 and a hundred $30. Copies were also supplied to San Francisco bookseller, G.W. Murray & Co in the hope of reaching a broad audience. Only one issue of this pioneer journal was published.

The frontispiece depicts "Mission of San Carmel". The other full page illustration is an engraved portrait of "Major General John A. Sutter." Vignettes of Sutter's Fort and the first State Capitol Building in Sacramento as it officially became the new center of state government grace its pages. 

Processing and shipping within the continental U.S. $25.00 plus 1.5% replacement cost insurance. Witherell's strives to provide as much information and photographs as possible but encourages in-person inspection by bidders. Condition statements are only for general guidance and should not be relied upon as complete statements of fact and do not constitute a representation, warranty or assumption of liability by Witherell's. All lots are sold "AS IS" under terms and conditions. Please be advised we do not provide porters nor packing materials for pick ups.

Estimate: $1,000 - $2,500
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$1,890
09/16/2020

Internet Bidding

19

Fremont, John Charles. Geographical Memoir upon Upper California, in Illustration of His Map of Oregon and California

Fremont, John Charles. [at head of title] 30th Congress, 1st Session. Senate. Miscellaneous. / No. 148. Geographical Memoir upon Upper California, in Illustration of His Map of Oregon and California, by John Charles Fremont: Addressed to the Senate of the United States. Washington: Wendell and Van Benthuysen, Printers. 1848. Collation: [1]title, [2]3-44 text, 45-67 appendix, [68] blank, fold. map. 8 3/4 x 5 in. Text leaves show moderate foxing. Map: folding. Map of / Oregon and Upper California / From the Surveys of / John Charles Fremont / And other Authorities / [rule] / Drawn by Charles Preuss / Under the Order of the / Senate of the United States / Washington City 1848. / [rule] / Lith by E. Weber & Co. Balto. 32 1/2 x 25 3/4 in. The folding map is in excellent condition. References: Cowan II, p.223; Graff 1429; Howell 50:89; Howes F-366; Kurutz 256; Wagner-Camp-Becker 150:1; Wheat, Books 58; Wheat, Transmississippi West 3: map 559, p.56, note 7.

The famed explorer wrote the text to support his monumental "Map of Oregon and Upper California." Its timing could not have been better as its publication coincided with the gold stampede. Consequently, it found its way into many Gold Rush publications. Fremont's narrative and the map drawn by Charles Preuss provided gold seekers with a reliable verbal and cartographical summary of the terrain they were about to encounter both on the overland journey and once they arrived at the gold fields. As Ferol Egan in his highly regarded Fremont: Explorer for a Restless Nation, explained, "The Geographical Memoir was extremely valuable. Here, for the first time, was a clear picture of the nature of the Great Basin, the Sierra Nevada, and the Pacific Coastal Range." Moreover, the "Pathfinder's map, designated for the first time the entrance to San Francisco Bay as Chrysopylae or, as translated, the "Golden Gate". Fremont gave it this memorable name in the spring of 1846 as it reminded him of the harbor of Constantinople and he predicted the riches of the Orient would flow through the Golden Gate. Impressed by what he saw during his travels from Lassen's Peak to the junction of the Gila and Colorado Rivers, he enthusiastically concluded that "Geographically, the position of this California is one of the best in world." He submitted his text to the Senate with the date of June 1848.

Processing and shipping within the continental U.S. $25.00 plus 1.5% replacement cost insurance. Witherell's strives to provide as much information and photographs as possible but encourages in-person inspection by bidders. Condition statements are only for general guidance and should not be relied upon as complete statements of fact and do not constitute a representation, warranty or assumption of liability by Witherell's. All lots are sold "AS IS" under terms and conditions. Please be advised we do not provide porters nor packing materials for pick ups.

Estimate: $1,000 - $2,500
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$1,513
09/16/2020

Internet Bidding

20

Brown, James Stephens. California Gold. An Authentic History of The First Find with the Names of Those Interested in the Discovery

Brown, James Stephens. California Gold. An Authentic History of The First Find with the Names of Those Interested in the Discovery. Published by the Author James S. Brown, Salt Lake City, Utah. Oakland, Cal. Pacific Press Publishing Company, 1894. Collation: [1] blank, [2] front. (port. of James S. Brown), [3]title, [4]copyright, 5-20 text. 7 x 4 3/4 in. Binding: Buff colored wrappers, stapled. Ornamental cover title. Front wrapper, slightly loose. Handwritten notes in pencil. Inserted into protective green cloth over boards slip case; dark red leather label on spine, gold stamped: CALIFORNIA GOLD *BROWN* 1894 with gold stamped ornaments. References: California Printing II:6, Cowan I, p.25; Cowan II, p.77; Descker 27: 58a; Eberstadt 104: 28; Graff 425; Holliday 134; Howell 328; Howes B-848; Kurutz 85; Rocq 1809; Sloan, Gold Rush, 13; Streeter 3018; Wheat, Books 22 (note).

Edward Eberstadt notes: "Of vital historical importance being the only printed relation - aside from that of Marshall himself - by an eyewitness of an participant in the gold discovery." Brown's recollection described his employment by Captain Sutter and his work with J.W. Marshall on building the mill on the American River. His account features a lively dialogue between Marshall and himself concerning the discovery. On January 24, 1848, after Marshall gathered several flakes, Brown related: "I picked up the largest piece, worth about fifty cents, and tested it with my teeth; as it did not give, I held it aloft and exclaimed, 'Gold, boys, gold!'" Brown told how six Mormons found gold an hour later, how the news spread, and how various early techniques were used to find the precious nuggets. With a tinge of bitterness, he recalled that Sutter never paid him for his work and that Sutter cursed Marshall and his discovery. Brown concluded with letters from historian John S. Hittell and Hubert Howe Bancroft's History Company "showing the relation of the writer to the gold discovery" and an affidavit by five fellow members of the Mormon Battalion. Brown, as a member of the battalion, reached California in early 1847. Brown's story was published on the occasion of a visit to San Francisco's Midwinter Fair in 1894. Only fifty five copies were printed although the number of copies continue to surface suggesting a larger printing. A previous and anonymous owner of the McClatchy copy wrote two notes in pencil. The first states: "I paid $30 or so for it. Have since traced the [Brown] family and secured the last copy." The last note simply identifies Brown as being with Marshall at the golden moment.

 Processing and shipping within the continental U.S. $25.00 plus 1.5% replacement cost insurance. Witherell's strives to provide as much information and photographs as possible but encourages in-person inspection by bidders. Condition statements are only for general guidance and should not be relied upon as complete statements of fact and do not constitute a representation, warranty or assumption of liability by Witherell's. All lots are sold "AS IS" under terms and conditions. Please be advised we do not provide porters nor packing materials for pick ups.

Estimate: $1,000 - $2,500
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$3,025
09/16/2020

Internet Bidding

21

G.A. Fleming, The Emigrant's Guide to the Golden Land & California: Its Past History

This lot is two works by the same author bound together.

Fleming, G.A. [wrapper title] Part 1. (Colored Edition.) Price 1s. [within ruled borders] The Emigrant's Guide to the Golden Land. California Its Past History; Its Present Position; Its Future Prospects; with a Minute and Authentic Account of the Discovery of the Gold Region, and the Subsequent, Important Proceedings. In the Course of the Work Will Be GivenPlain Directions to Emigrants to California, or the United States. Or to Canada; Australia; New Zealand, or Any Other British Settlement. Shewing Them When to Go. Where to Go.  How to Go. Tables of Distances and Tables of Expenses, from British Ports to All Ports of the World, Will Be Correctly Given; and Full Information Respecting the Different Emigrant Establishments under the Direction of the Government; with the Class of Persons Who Are Eligible for Receiving Governmental Assistance, and Instructions How that Assistance is to Be Obtained and in What It Consists. Illustrated with plates. London: Printed for the Proprietors and Sold by All Booksellers in Town and Country. [Engraved title page] The Emigrant's Guide to the Golden Land, Shewing Him When to Go, Where to Go. How to Go. [engraved illustration: Scene on a Branch of the Sacramento] London, Printed for the Booksellers, 1850. Collation: Plate, blank leaf, frontispiece, title [hand-colored with illus], verso blank, [1]2-48 text. 8 3/4 x 6 in. Binding: Original green front and rear wrappers. It is bound together with the large edition. The verso on the front wrapper consists of a speech of Lord John Russell on "Colonial Policy". The recto of the rear wrapper consists of an engraving "Lump of Gold from California" (weighing 6 lbs) and "Extract from the Illustrated News of January 26, 1850, titled "Gold from California". The verso is an "Address" giving the would be emigrant practical advice. References: Kurutz 243. 

The highlight of this exceedingly rare wrapper bound guide are the two hand colored engravings. The first is titled "Emigrant Party on the Road to California" and depicts a long line of covered wagons loaded with families headed into a formidable mountain range. It is frequently reproduced as the quintessential representation of overland travel. The title page is embellished with barefoot miners digging and panning for gold on a branch of the Sacramento River. It too is one of the classic illustrations of the Gold Rush. Authorship has been attributed to G.A. Fleming and this 48 page edition may have been a precursor to the 270 page edition with the same title. Its text is directed more to those going to Australia and New Zealand than to California.

Bound with:

[Fleming, G.A.] California: Its Past History; Its Present Position; Its Future Prospects: Containing a History of the Country from Its Colonization by the Spaniards to the Present Time; A Sketch of its Geographical and Physical Features; and a Minute and Authentic Account of the Discovery of the Gold Region, and the Subsequent Important Proceedings. Including a History of the Rise, Progress, and Present condition of the Mormon Settlements. With an Appendix, Containing the Official Reports Made to the Government of the United States. London. Printed for the Proprietors, and Sold by All Booksellers in Town and Country. 1850. Collation: half title with hadn't colored engraving, [ii]title, [iii] printer's imprint, [v]vi-viii contents, [1]2-6 introduction, [7]8-238 text, [239]240-270 appendix. 9 x 6 in. Map: Facing p.33. Untitled hand colored map of western U.S. showing "Gold Region". 8 1/2 x 5 in. Plate: Facing p.81. Encampment in the Valley of the Sacramento. Binding: Blind stamped brown cloth over boards with new leather spin gold stamped title and date. the binding is partially scuffed. The wrapper title for the pamphlet serves as the front free endpaper. Edges are untrimmed. References: Cowan I, p.33, Cowan II, p.93: Decker 36:149; Graff 1347; Holliday 159; Howes F-178; Norris 536; Streeter 2623; Wheat, Books, 4; Wheat, Maps 144. 

Distinguished collector Everett D. Graff noted that in his copy the following is written on the front free endpaper, "G.A. Fleming is the author, according to a presentation copy owned by B.E. Waters." The author opened this detailed volume with sage advice to the English gold seeker on such matters as the arrival at port, fares, outfits, and conduct on board ship. the rest of the volume was assembled from the writings of Americans such as John C. Fremont and Bayard Taylor and excerpts taken from English eyewitnesses originally published in English newspapers. Fleming also packed into the book geographical and historical data on the SpanishMexican period. He gave a history of the gold discovery and a description of life in the mines by condensing Dr. Tyrwhitt Brooks' (Henry Vizetelly) fictional work which Fleming cals "The only complete and reliable account fo the actual life of a Gold Seeker." Fleming warned his readers of the hardships of California and preached: "The steady tradesman will, in the end, prove th true gold finder."

Processing and shipping within the continental U.S. $25.00 plus 1.5% replacement cost insurance. Witherell's strives to provide as much information and photographs as possible but encourages in-person inspection by bidders. Condition statements are only for general guidance and should not be relied upon as complete statements of fact and do not constitute a representation, warranty or assumption of liability by Witherell's. All lots are sold "AS IS" under terms and conditions. Please be advised we do not provide porters nor packing materials for pick ups.

Estimate: $10,000 - $20,000
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$6,050
09/16/2020

Internet Bidding

22

Alonzo Delano Old Block’s Sketch – Book; or, Tales of California Life

Illustrated with Numerous Elegant Designs, by Nahl, The Cruickshank of California. Sacramento: James Anthony & Co., Publishers and Printers, Union Office. 1856.

 

COLLATION: [1] title, [2] blank, [i] ii-iii introduction, [iv] dedication, [1] 2-78 text, (double columns), [79] conclusion, [80] blank, [81] advt., [82]. 8¾ x 5¾ in. 

BINDING: Book is placed in a custom-made slip case; half dark blue leather over tan boards. Original cover wrappers lacking. 

ILLUSTRATIONS: Fifteen wood engravings included in pagination.

 

REFERENCES: Cowan I, p. 65; Cowan II, p. 163; Graff 1043; Greenwood 676; Holliday 284; Howell 412; Howes D-231; Kurutz 180a; Streeter 2800; Wheat, Books 57, note; Zamorano 80, 29

A companion to the earlier Pen-Knife Sketches (see next entry), this collection of stories and observations was dedicated by Delano to the miners of California. He loved his miners and wrote with deep feeling about the lives they endured. In these sketches he recalled his snug and cozy miner’s cabin, his amigos like “Old Swamp” and Bogue, Sunday in the mines, his first day in Sacramento, the burning of Grass Valley, and a mountain storm. As so energetically told by Delano, Sunday was not a day of worship or rest but a time to frolic with horseracing, gambling, and drinking. Waxing nostalgic, Delano, a native of Auburn, New York, concluded with the following celebration of his new home: “There is probably no country in the world whose early settlement abounds in more thrilling incident, more daring adventures, or more hardy and chivalrous deeds, than that of our beloved California.” 

 

The full-page Armstrong engravings based on Charles Christian Nahl sketches of life in the mines and mining towns add greatly to the appeal of this Sacramento imprint. In particular, the last engraving presents a delightful portrait of this pioneer humorist. It humorously shows him “leaving this world on a black cat’s back, with my face towards his tail.” Leslie E. Bliss, Henry E.  Huntington’s first librarian, states in The Zamorano 80: "Both author and illustrator are characteristically Californian, and few volumes have a truer flavor of the Mother Lode than this result of their combined efforts." Processing and shipping within the continental U.S. $25.00 plus 1.5% replacement cost insurance. Witherell's strives to provide as much information and photographs as possible but encourages in-person inspection by bidders. Condition statements are only for general guidance and should not be relied upon as complete statements of fact and do not constitute a representation, warranty or assumption of liability by Witherell's. All lots are sold "AS IS" under terms and conditions. Please be advised we do not provide porters nor packing materials for pick ups.

 

 

Estimate: $2,500 - $5,000
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$3,630
09/16/2020

Internet Bidding

23

Delano, Alonzo. Pen Knife Sketches; or, Chips of the Old Block, A series of Original Illustrated Letters, Written by One of California's Pioneer Miners, and Dedicated to that Class of Her Citizens by the Author

Delano, Alonzo. Pen Knife Sketches; or, Chips of the Old Block, A series of Original Illustrated Letters, Written by One of California's Pioneer Miners, and Dedicated to that Class of Her Citizens by the Author. [ornamental rule] Sacramento: Published at the Union office, No. 21 J street, between Front and Second. [rule] 1853. [wrapper title] Same as above; addition of CHIPS / OF THE / OLD BLOCK. [with author's portrait]. Imprint varies: Published by James Anthony & Co., Union Office, 21 J Street, Sacramento, 1853. Collation: front., [1]title, [2] copyright, [3]-4 introduction, [5] publisher's preface, [6] dedication, [7-8]. plate, [9] 10-112 text. 9 x 6 in.  Brown pictorial wrappers. Illustrations: 24 full page wood engravings included in the pagination. References: Cowan I, p.65; Cowan II, p. 163; Eberstadt 103: 87; Greenwood 383; Howell 1517; Howes D-232; Kurutz 181a; Rocq 6047; Wheat, Books 57, note.

Alonzo Delano, affectionately known as "Old Block" possessed that wonderful ability to record what he saw with pathos, laughter, irony, and realism. Delano was the miner's spokesman, their champion. Consequently, everyone loved this long-nosed wit. Delano's biographer, G. Ezra Dane, wrote Delano "was the first truly Californian man of letters and no one has described or interpreted the human elements of the Gold Rush so sympathetically as he." His literary style, Dane characterized as "a bit rustic, but flowing, chuckling and lucid as Sierra stream." This word painter of California life, along with George Horatio Derby (a.k.a. John Phoenix) established a unique brand of Western humor based on the strange and wonderful scenes they saw. Discouraged by his life in the mines and highly depressed, Delano sat helplessly in Col. [U.S.] Grant's office in Sacramento cogitating what to do while staring at a blank sheet of paper. He took out his pocket knife to "nib" his pen, and as if thunderstruck, he related how "on the instant 'Pen Knife Sketches' were conceived and within ten minutes the embryo was fostered into life, and had a being on one side of a sheet of foolscap."

Leaving the mining country, Delano with his distinctive proboscis, and filled with inspiration, moved to San Francisco and began publishing his witty and delightful observations of California foe the Pacific News and the California Daily Courier. Well received, they were gathered with other Delano writings into book form as Pen Knife Sketches, 1853. Instantly popular, the Sacramento Daily Union sold 16,000 copies and produced a second edition with an 1854 date on its wrappers. According to an advertisement in the Daily Union (July 1, 1855) copies sold at a rate of $15.00 per 100. The publishers enriched the wrapper bound book volume with full page wood engravings by Thomas Armstrong based on drawings by the great California artist Charles Christian Nahl. The portrait of the long nosed Old Block on San Francisco's Long Wharf is a classic. Two other scenes warrant attention: "The Miner's Sunday" shows a shirtless and lonely 49er washing out his ragged clothes in a Sierra stream; and the other "A Live Woman in the Mines" depicts a throng of miners whooping it up as an actual woman had come out of her tent. In the early days, the gentle sex accounted for less than five percent of the population. Processing and shipping within the continental U.S. $25.00 plus 1.5% replacement cost insurance. 

Estimate: $1,000 - $2,500
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$2,520
09/16/2020

Internet Bidding

24

Seyd, Ernest. California and Its Resources. A Work for the Merchant, the Capitalist and the Emigrant

Seyd, Ernest. California and Its Resources. A Work for the Merchant, the Capitalist and the Emigrant. London: Trubner and CO., 60, Paternoster Row. 1858.

Collation: Front., [iv]pp., 1-168pp, [I]advertisement. 8 1/2 x 5 1/2 in. Binding: Original black cover over blind-stamped boards; gilt-stamped title on front cover and spine. Front cover is embellished with a reproduction of a 50 dollar gold slug. Binding is loose; some text leaves are loose. Plates: 22 illustrations on 18 plates including 1 folding; 8 hand tinted lithographs. Maps: Between pp.80-81; fold. California. No date. 14 1/2 x 11 3/4 in. [inset] Map of Western U.S. 5 x 5 1/4 in. Minor tears and staining. Following p. 168; fold. Untitled map of the world showing overland and sea routes to California. 12 x 18 in. Minor tears.

References: Cowan I, p. 210; Cowan II, p. 57; Currey & Kruska 296; Howes S-310; Norris 3573; Rocq 17136; Wheat, Books, 181; Wheat, Maps, 312.

Currey and Kruska, the experts on the books and literature of Yosemite and the Sierra wrote: "One of the best early surveys of the natural resources of California, compiled to 'prove that there is not a country on the face of the globe more highly endowed with all the elements of prosperity, richer in precious metals, richer in agricultural and other prospects than California.'" Seyd, of course, emphasized its mineral wealth stating, for example, "The chief product of California is gold, a fact well known all over the world." The hand colored lithographic plates produced by Lewis and Bohm of London are exceptional depicting gold mining, steamships, and natural wonders. As Currey and Kruska point out, the two Yosemite views, "The Yo-Hamite Falls" and "The Yo-Hamite Valley" were derived from sketches by Thomas A. Ayers in 1855 and "they appear to be the first views of Yosemite Valley published in a book." Wheat in his monumental The Maps of the California Gold Region described the map "California" as "a rather crude affair" marred by many misspellings such as "Alamed, Marposa and Fremont's rude" 1844.

Processing and shipping within the continental U.S. $25.00 plus 1.5% replacement cost insurance. Witherell's strives to provide as much information and photographs as possible but encourages in-person inspection by bidders. Condition statements are only for general guidance and should not be relied upon as complete statements of fact and do not constitute a representation, warranty or assumption of liability by Witherell's. All lots are sold "AS IS" under terms and conditions. Please be advised we do not provide porters nor packing materials for pick ups.

Estimate: $1,000 - $2,500
Unsold

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25

The Miner's Own Book: Containing Correct Illustrations and Descriptions of the Various Modes of California Mining

The Miner's Own Book, Containing Correct Illustrations and Descriptions of the Various Modes of California Mining, Including All the Improvements Introduced from the Earliest Day to the Present Time. San Francisco: Published by Hutchings & Rosenfield,146 Montgomery Street, Whitton, Towne & Co. Printers, for. Clay and Sansome Streets. 1858. Collation: [1] title, [2] contents, [3] note by the publishers, [4] blank, [5] 6-32 text. 9 x 5 5/8 in. Binding: tan pictorial wrappers. Cover title within rules; engraving of a miner. Adits. On verso of front wrapper and recto and verso of back wrapper. Copy comes with protective slipcase; dark blue leather backstop over green cloth boards. Backstrip: gold stamped title and date with raised bands. Illustrations: 27 wood engravings. References: Cowan I, p. 154; Cowan II, p.431; Graff 2813; Greenwood 967; Howes M 639; Kurutz 444; Norris 547; Rocq 15965; Streeter 2839; Wheat, Books 141.

James Mason Hutchings published this wrapper bound title to render "familiar, through correct views and descriptions, everything connected with the immense mining operations of the State." He also stated that he thought it was the first book of its kind ever published. Much of information contained therein originally appeared in his magazine, Hutchings Illustrated California Magazine for the years 1856 and 1857. It certainly stands as a landmark book in washing away whole hillsides via hydraulic mining. Hutchings credited Edward E. Matteson with introducing this new technology at American Hill, Nevada in 1852. While focusing on modern mining, the text does cover methods and tools used during the early period. Charles Christian Nahl, the great Gold Rush artist , supplied many of the illustrations. One of the engravings show Chinese miners working a cradle. These illustrations are now recognized as classics. Nahl came to California during the height of the Gold Rush and made observations and sketches that later appeared in pictorial newspapers and magazines and oil paintings.

The rear wrapper is a striking advertisement for the great California pioneer photographer R.H. Vance. It includes a beautiful engraving of his gallery at the corner of Montgomery and Sacramento Streets in San Francisco.

Processing and shipping within the continental U.S. $25.00 plus 1.5% replacement cost insurance. Witherell's strives to provide as much information and photographs as possible but encourages in-person inspection by bidders. Condition statements are only for general guidance and should not be relied upon as complete statements of fact and do not constitute a representation, warranty or assumption of liability by Witherell's. All lots are sold "AS IS" under terms and conditions. Please be advised we do not provide porters nor packing materials for pick ups.

Estimate: $1,000 - $2,500
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$2,420
09/16/2020

Internet Bidding

26

Ubiquitous Sacramento, Vols 1-11, 13-18, Feb 28, 1858 to June 20, 1858

Ubiquitous Sacramento, Vol 1-11, 13-18; February 28, 1858 to June 20, 1858. In box. 

The Ubiquitous. [Sacramento] Edward "Ned" McGowan, Editor. Each issue four pages. 17 x 11 1/4 in. Issues: Vol.1, No.2, February 28, 1858, Nos.3-11, Nos.13-18, June 20, 1858. Condition: Most of the issues are in excellent condition. Some do show browning and foxing and wear along the left edge indicating that they were bound at one time. The newspaper is housed in a protective black half leather over blue cloth boards clamshell case. The backstrip is worn. Reference: Kemble, Edward C. A History of California Newspapers 1846-1858, p. 164.

Not surprisingly, The Ubiquitous continued the thrust of the Phoenix with much pejorative news about the "Stranglers" or members of the 1856 San Francisco Vigilance Committee that wanted to hang McGowan for his role in the murder of James King of William. Issued on Sundays, his paper emerged as a four page gossip column designed to promote his book, Narrative of Edward McGowan and besmirch his accusers. With the February 28 issue, the editor began a "Portrait Gallery of the Stranglers" with an engraved likeness of his editorial targets. The first to be profiled was Isaac Bluxome, Jr. with McGowan writing he "keeps two mistresses and is at the same time courting a fine young lady." The last issue in the McClatchy collection is "McGowan's Portrait of the Stranglers!" with short, nasty profiles of each. McGowan did include other news that was usually related to crime and an occasional announcement of a theatrical performance. Copies of The Ubiquitous are exceedingly rare.

Processing and shipping within the continental U.S. $95.00 plus 1.5% replacement cost insurance.

Estimate: $2,500 - $5,000
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$4,235
09/16/2020

Internet Bidding

27

The Phoenix, Edward "Ned" McGowan, Editor

The Phoenix,[Sacramento] Edward "Ned" McGowan, Editor. Weekly. Each issue, four pages. 16 3/4 x 11 1/2 in. Issues: Vol.1, No.6, October 4, 1857, Nos. 7-20 January 10, 1858. Vol.1, No. 24, February 7, 1858. The newspaper is housed in a protective black half leather over blue cloth boards clamshell case. Reference: Kemble, Edward C. A History of California Newspapers 1846-1858. Reprinted from the Supplement to the Sacramento Union of December 25, 1858. Edited and with a Foreword by Helen Harding Bretnor. Los Gatos, CA: The Talisman Press, 1962. Pp. 164, 360.

Respected pioneer newspaper historian, Edward C. Kemble, in his colossal "A History of California Newspapers 1846-1858" that appeared as a supplement to the December 25, 1858 Sacramento Union touched on the curious history of The Phoenix and the checkered career of its editor, "Ned" McGowan. Kemble opined: "Though scarcely deserving a name among our public prints, the sheet being a vehicle for the malignant abuse and indecency of a private individual, may be mentioned as a part of the typography of our city. It was vended by E. McGowan, from about the Fall of 1857, until the Summer's of '58. A few months previous to its discontinuance, it was called the Ubiquitous." Prior to coming to the river city, Judge McGowan found himself in deep trouble. Active in San Francisco politics, McGowan became known as a ballot box stuffer and as a bank robber who used funds to support a prostitution ring. Even worse, the judge was accused of being an accomplice of James P. Casey in the murder of James King of William. The 1856 Vigilance Committee indicted him but he was acquitted. In defense of his innocence, he wrote an published in 1857 a thick 240 page book titled: Narrative of Edward McGowan, Including a Full Account of the Author's Adventures and Perils While Persecuted by the San Francisco Vigilance Committee of 1856. With his life threatened and reputation blackened, he fled to Sacramento and Started The Phoenix principally as a weapon for attacking his many enemies and resurrecting his tarnished reputation. In each issue he included hi own narrative titled "McGowan's Lives of the 'Stranglers!!!"" which told of the great injustice he had suffered and profiled whose who condemned him. McGowan repeatedlylisted the names of the "Stranglers" or Vigilantes below his own publisher's imprint in issue after issue. He also loaded many of his columns with crime reports.

 

Processing and shipping within the continental U.S. $95.00 plus 1.5% replacement cost insurance. Witherell's strives to provide as much information and photographs as possible but encourages in-person inspection by bidders. Condition statements are only for general guidance and should not be relied upon as complete statements of fact and do not constitute a representation, warranty or assumption of liability by Witherell's. All lots are sold "AS IS" under terms and conditions. Please be advised we do not provide porters nor packing materials for pick ups.

Estimate: $2,500 - $5,000
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$4,235
09/16/2020

Internet Bidding

28

The Illustrated California News, Publ by the Alta California

The Illustrated California News, Published semi-monthly, at the Office of the Alta California, Washington St., Portsmouth Square. [San Francisco]. Each issue, eight pages. 15.75" x 11". Issues: Vol 1, No 1, September 1, 1850, 8 pp., 5 illustrations; Vol. 1, No. 2, September 15, 1850; Vol. 1, No. 3, October 15, 1850; Vol. 1, No. 4, November 1, 1850, and Vol. 1, No. 5, November 15, 1850.

Its opening line states: "California is now the cynosure of every eye." The editors planned to devote its columns to California events and developments rather than reprinting news from the national and European presses. Importantly, it saw a need to preserve California history by recording current events and presenting descriptions of its geography. Dr. Robert D. Semple, for example, gave a fascinating recollection of the origin of the "Bear Flag" and the Bear Flag revolt at Sonoma on June 10, 1846. The paper did reprint news from other California newspapers with headlines like, "will the mines Continue Productive?"; squatter riots in Sacramento, ship wrecks, steamship explosions, "Fun in Sacramento' and the advantages of the port city of Vallejo as the logical location of the state capital. Embellished with large black and white engravings, the Illustrated News supplemented the more famous Alta California which was not illustrated. The masthead of each of these issues carried an engraving the San Francisco Embarcadero. Curiously none of the issues listed the names of the editors or the skilled engraver employed by the paper. In contrast, the Daily Alta California in its masthead stated that it was published by Edward Gilbert & Co. with Edward C. Kemble, J.E. Durivage and E.Conner. Page 8 of the inaugural number of the Illustrated California News features a 9.25 x 12.25 in view of "The Golden Gates". The Illustrated News was located in the "office of the Alta California". The September 2, 1850 issue of the Alta California announced the publication of its companion title. However, it offered the following apology: "The present number of the News has been prepared as a specimen sheet, it lacks that degree of finish in its mechanical execution…" and the engravings were printed on a speedy steam press and not a more appropriate hand press. Moreover it came with very few advertisements. Processing and shipping within the continental U.S. $55.00 plus 1.5% replacement cost insurance. Witherell's strives to provide as much information and photographs as possible but encourages in-person inspection by bidders. Condition statements are only for general guidance and should not be relied upon as complete statements of fact and do not constitute a representation, warranty or assumption of liability by Witherell's. All lots are sold "AS IS" under terms and conditions. Please be advised we do not provide porters nor packing materials for pick ups.

Estimate: $2,500 - $5,000
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$3,025
09/16/2020

Internet Bidding

29

The State, A Journal of Politics and Opinion

The State, A Journal of Politics and Opinion, San Francisco. Each issue, four pages. 20.5" x 13". Issues: Vol.1, No.1, April 5, 1879-VOl.1, No. 11, June 14, 1879. Pages bound in half red leather over red thick red paper boards with marbled endpapers. Front cover gold stamped: THE STATE / ornament / Geo. C. Perkins. The State, edited by journalist, economist and social reformer, Henry George, came out the same year as his landmark best-selling book, Progress and Poverty. Because of the land monopolies dominated the railroad barons, he argued, the promise of California was no more. To equalize California, George, through his book and newspaper promoted the revolutionary concept of the "single-tax", whereby only land would be taxed and that private property should be abolished. In his "Salutatory" George stated, "I commence herewith the publication of a Democratic paper." A major theme in his newspaper was the opposition to the new state constitution which George believed only worsened the condition of the ordinary laborer in favor of the economic elite. However, the state legislature ratified the new constitution on May 7, 1879. Despite his best efforts, reform did not occur and George took his message and family to New York City in 1880.

The McClatchy copy was owned by California governor George Clement Perkins. A Republican, he served as governor 1880-1883, first to work under the new constitution.

References: Hart, James D., A Companion to California: Oxford University Press, 1978; p.157; Walker, Franklin, San Francisco's Literary Frontier, New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1939, p. 292-304. 

Processing and shipping within the continental U.S. $50.00 plus 1.5% replacement cost insurance.

Estimate: $1,000 - $2,500
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$605
09/16/2020

Internet Bidding

30

Forster, George G. The Gold Regions of California:Being a Succinct Description of the Geography, History, Topography and General Features of California

Forster, George G. The Gold Regions of California: Being a Succinct Description of the Geography, History, Topography, and General Features of California: Including a Carefully Prepared Account of the Gold Regions of that Fortunate Country. Prepared from Official Documents and Other Authentic Sources. Edited by G.C. Foster. Third Edition. New York: DeWitt & Davenport, Tribune Buildings. 1848. Collation: map,[I] title, [ii] copyright and printer's imprint, [iii] iv-vii preface, [viii] blank, [9] 10-80 text, advt. leaf, verso blank. 9 1/2 x 6 in. Binding: Front wrapper: [printed in gold ink within ornamental borders; above border]: Second edition. [within borders] The Gold Mines of California. And also a Geographical, Topographical and Historical View of the Country, from Official Documents and Authentic Sources, with A Map of the Country, and Particularly of the Gold Region; Edited by G.G. Foster, Esq. Price Twenty-Five Cents. New-York; Published by DeWItt & Davenport, Tribune Building. Book is placed in a half polished brown leather slipcase over brown cloth boards. Map: Frontispiece: Untitled map of California from Los Angeles to Sutter Buttes with Gold Region encircled by dotted line. 7 x 4 1/4 in. References: Down I, p.89; Cowan II, p. 219; Eberstadt 107: 58; Howes F-287; Kurutz 250; Streeter 2529; Wheat, Books, 77; Wheat, Maps, 39.

The distinguished antiquarian bookseller Edward Eberstadt wrote:"This is the first considerable pamphlet on the Gold Regions and but two others (Sherwood and Simpson) are contemporary with it. The author was the first to suggest going to California in companies or associations, and he predicts that 'one year will see ten or fifteen thousand heady and adventurous Americans in the heart of California, ready to dig gold." Foster, in his eloquent and stirring introduction, also correctly predicted that a fortune could be made by the enterprising blacksmith, wheelwright, carpenter, shoemaker, and other skilled trades. This slender work is a useful anthology of some of the earliest reports of the gold discovery and features the writings of Farnham, Mason, Doniphan, Larkin, Folsom, Fremont, Colton and articles from the June and August issues of The Californian. Foster's preface includes one of the oft-quoted statements regarding the impact of J.W. Marshall's great discovery: "The recent reports concerning the discovery of immense regions where gold-bright, glittering gold, the first, last and only friend of man in these slippery, selfish days - can be gathered in handfuls and brought away in bags and baskets, with no more machinery and labor than shovel-work and a tin pan - must add immense force and activity to the already rapid emigration."

Foster's pamphlet is an outstanding example of the publishing frenzy generated by the gold discovery. Between 1848 and 1849 five versions were printed with essentially the same number of pages but with variations on the number of advertising leaves and the printing of the map. The McClatchy copy is an excellent example. Its title page indicates that it is the third edition but the wrapper title states "Second Edition". This copy has a single leaf frontispiece map of California whereas other editions feature a large folding map compiled by J.H. Colton showing land and water routes to golden land. 

Processing and shipping within the continental U.S. $25.00 plus 1.5% replacement cost insurance. Witherell's strives to provide as much information and photographs as possible but encourages in-person inspection by bidders. Condition statements are only for general guidance and should not be relied upon as complete statements of fact and do not constitute a representation, warranty or assumption of liability by Witherell's. All lots are sold "AS IS" under terms and conditions. Please be advised we do not provide porters nor packing materials for pick ups.

Estimate: $1,000 - $2,500
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$3,465
09/16/2020

Internet Bidding
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